Herbs

Hawthorn Berries Whole

Certified Organic & Kosher Certified

Spanish Translation: Tejocote

COMMON NAME

 

Standardized: hawthorn
Other: English hawthorn, one-seed hawthorn

 

BOTANICAL NAME

 

Crataegus monogyna Jacq.
Plant Family: Rosaceae

 

OVERVIEW

 

INTRODUCTION

The folklore and legends surrounding the hawthorn tree is quite large, and goes back many centuries, especially in Europe and the British Isles. The most famous hawthorn in Britain is the Holy Thorn of Glastonbury, which grows at Glastonbury Tor, the supposed resting place of King Arthur. According to legend, the tree was grown after Joseph of Arimathea, upon arriving at Glastonbury Tor, thrust his staff into the ground, and from this the tree grew. Although the original is no longer there, several of its supposed descendents still grow there. When it blooms during the winter, a sprig is traditionally sent to the Queen, who is said to decorate her breakfast table on Christmas morning. Hawthorn fruit has long been used as a food and medicine in Europe; particularly Germany, Austria, and Switzerland. Many clinical studies have been conducted on hawthorn over the past 20 years with great promise. The berry is a yellowish brown to wine-red, oval, wrinkled, and berry-like fruit (actually a pome).

CONSTITUENTS

Flavonoids and oligomeric procyanidins. The berries contain more hyperoside than the leaves and flowers, and the leaves and flowers contain more vitexin rhamnoside than the berries.

PARTS USED

The whole berry, dried, crushed and powdered

TYPICAL PREPARATIONS

Hawthorn berries are more often used to make tinctures than teas, smoothies and punches. May also be taken encapsulated or as an extract.

 

PRECAUTIONS

 

Specific: No known precautions.
General: We recommend that you consult with a qualified healthcare practitioner before using herbal products, particularly if you are pregnant, nursing, or on any medications.

         

        For educational purposes only This information has not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration.
        This information is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

         

        Herbs & Information provided by Mountain Rose Herbs. To learn more about them, visit their website MountainRoseHerbs

         

        Picture by: The Prana House